Things to consider

From the Slopes to the Hot Spring, Enjoy the Spirit of Japan


A visit to japan will provide the visitor with an experience quite unlike any other. You will find yourself immersed in a world that is steeped in ancient tradition and custom, and is also the home to some of the planet’s greatest technological advancements. In addition to the contrast between old and new, visitors will find a stunning landscape that takes you from pristine ski slopes one day, to hot springs the next.

Located on the ring of fire, Japan is prone to experiencing tectonic activity. It lays on a number of faults, and this has helped to create the numerous volcanoes that are located throughout the nation. Where there are volcanoes, there are slopes, making Japan an excellent destination for skiing fanatics. In addition to creating volcanoes, the heat of the molten rock below sometimes escapes to the surface and heats natural pools to make hot springs. With hot springs located around the nation alongside snow-topped volcanoes, visitors are in for a real treat in the contrast between snow, ice and the heat from below.

Stunning Scenery

Although the inherent risks are obvious, this tectonic activity also makes Japan a place of stunning natural beauty. Stunning volcanoes such as the dormant mount Fuji pepper the landscape. Mount Fuji is not the only volcano here, and there are many others for visitors to enjoy. Whole regions such as the stunning Nagano Prefecture are a haven for visitors from all over the planet. The breathtaking, rugged terrain has many visitors coming back for more year after year.

Excellent Slopes

With such mountainous terrain, comes some excellent ski opportunities. The popular Nagano Prefecture is home to some excellent ski resorts that welcome skiers from all over the world. The powder here is often untouched, making a great attraction to powder fans. Here, not only will you get to enjoy the excellent skiing, you will also get to experience Japanese culture in this truly beautiful part of the world. A visit to this part of the world will be so much more than just another skiing trip. With ungroomed slopes available, skiers that come to the region really have an opportunity to get off the beaten track.

Hot Springs

With so much tectonic activity happening below, Japan is home to some of the world’s best known hot springs. Holiday makers can literally spend one day skiing on the slopes, and the next making the most of these natural hot-spots. Heated by the molten rock lying below, these hotspots are an attraction for people from all over the world. In addition to attracting people, the local wildlife has also made the most of these spots. The famous snow monkeys live in the region and can be found keeping warm in the hot springs, while still covered in the snow and ice of the otherwise cold climate.

If you are looking for a skiing holiday with a difference, then Madarao in Japan’s Nagano Prefecture will make the perfect choice. After experiencing the skiing, culture, scenery and everything else Japan has to offer, you too will see why so many people return every single

Do’s and Don’ts of the Slope


Before you hit the slopes, you might want to know a few basic things that are expected of you. Well, some are just obvious unspoken rules, but this doesn’t mean that people do not break them from time to time. Here at Madarao Ski Resort we don’t want you to look awkward and attract some giggles. So we thought we could mention a few do’s and don’ts for when you hit the slopes.


Do: do get trained by a qualified instructor. The formality and professionalism that comes with someone unfamiliar allows you to focus and take the training seriously. Also this allows both of you to not get carried away by emotions.

Don’t: don’t get trained by a spouse, a friend or someone close to you. Both of you might be worked up and end up snapping at each other or worse. So as much as it sounds so appealing, please do not get trained by somebody close.


Do’s: always wear the right skiing gear. For starters, you can hire gear such as skiing boots and boards. Also wear well-fitting and comfortable gear.  Also remember that you are skiing in the slope, so always stay warm and dry. Layer a lot of light clothes as opposed to few heavy clothes. Also wear water proof jacket and trouser.

Ski Equipment

Don’t: don’t wear ill-fitting and uncomfortable gear. Trust me; this is neither the time nor place to flaunt your Italian suit. Avoid shopping for expensive gear, or shopping online, especially if it’s your first time hitting the slopes. As a rule of thumb, it’s always advisable to first hire skiing gear, and then you can shop later when you get familiar with the skiing ropes.


Do: exercise caution always. Always wear your helmets and goggles. Also stay in your limits, giving way to other skiers.

Don’t: get carried away by your prowess too fast. You might learn the basics on the first day and get tempted to hit the moguls. Please don’t. Take it one step at a time.


Do: practice the right stance. Always keep your knees bent and your eyes trained straight ahead. This gives you better control, and enables you to absorb shocks.

Don’t:  lean ahead or lean backwards (back seating), as you could fall forward or backwards. Avoid looking down at your skis as you will end up losing focus of what’s ahead.

Taking Care of Your Ski Board

Do: tune your skiing board as often as you can. This helps keep it in top shape, and you can smoothly glide over the slopes. For more tips on waxing your board, see  .

Don’t: neglect your ski board. Always keep the board dry to avoid rust and jagged edges that slow you down and damage the board too soon.

Exercise in Advance

Do: get your body in top shape before skiing. Make sure that you exercise and are flexible. Remember skiing requires a lot of bending and fast movements. Also learn a few skiing lingo. You don’t want to be looking blank or getting mad when somebody calls you a bunny. For more skiing lingo, see  

Don’t: get lazy. Keep your body and mind prepared for skiing well before you hit the slopes. We don’t want you getting frustrated if you get strains on your first day skiing.

Where to Stay

Do: get yourself booked in a comfortable hotel, resort or chalet. You need a place where you can relax and maybe enjoy a beer or two after a long day skiing. Take into consideration how much you are willing to spend, and for what. Ski resorts are particularly good since they offer the best when it comes to skiing. You can get a qualified instructor, the right gear and the right slopes. You can check out our offerings here.

Don’t: overlook your safety and comfort when you go skiing. Also avoid booking a hotel or resort during the last minute, since you could end up spending more or settling for less than what you deserve.

Loosen Up!

Do: by all means have fun. Loads of fun. Laugh at yourself when you fall. Then pick yourself up. Make new friends, and make great memories too.

Don’t: get worked up. Be patient with yourself and avoid dampening your mood as well as that of others.

Top Tips on Different Wax Types for Different Slope Conditions.


Tips on Different Wax Types for Different Slope Conditions.

Waxing is a maintenance activity that involves applying a lubricant to your ski’s to reduce friction mainly. Waxing works by providing a hydrophobic surface on your board, which resists water.

What’s the Importance of Ski Waxing?

With time, your board gets damaged by hitting rocks, rusting, friction or chemical damage from chemically treated snow.

The most obvious reason for waxing is to reduce friction, hence being able to move faster. Waxing also reduces the rate at which your ski’s wears out.

How Often Should I Wax My Skis?

There’s no given duration after which you should wax your ski’s. However, logic dictates that the more you use your board, the more you should wax it. Just looking at your board can tell you whether or not you need to wax it. If the bottom looks dull and gray, it’s time to wax. There is no such thing as too much waxing. In fact, the more you do it, the better.

Ski Tuning

Ski tuning is a general term for ski maintenance that aims to keep your ski’s sharp, clean and smooth.

Waxing in itself will not make much of a difference if you haven’t repaired your base and edges. In fact, waxing is the last tuning step, preceded by base repair and edge work.

Base repair involves cleaning out your board or ski using a cleaning cloth, which removes dirt, grease, and accumulated wax. Most tuning kits come with a specialized cleaning liquid, which brings out hidden dirt and dissolves wax. After cleaning the ski, apply this liquid, and then wipe it out with a clean towel after 10 minutes.

Next step is the p-tex filling, whereby you light your p-tex candle and wait until it is flames. Let the drops drip onto your ski’s/board, filling out all cuts and scrapes. Give the p-tex 10-15 minutes to cool then scrape it off with a metal scraper, to remove excess p-tex.

Edge tuning involves keeping the edges of your board or ski sharp. Blunt edges have a weak grip on snow, which slows you down. The first step is running a diamond stone, over the edges, giving you smooth edges

Next step is using a special file to sharpen your edges. Do this from tip to tail, taking care not to distort the shape of the edges.



What Wax Should I Use?

  1. All temperature waxes- these waxes are designed to work in all temperature conditions. Sometimes you may find yourself skiing in different geographical areas, or unable to predict what the temperature will be. All temperature wax, in this case, will be your best bet.
  2. Temperature specific waxes- temperature specific waxes are usually identified as either red or yellow. They both work in a smaller range of temperatures than all temperature waxes.

Red waxes are designed for colder temperatures of between -4 and -10 degrees (25 and 18 degrees Fahrenheit). Red wax is the best when it comes to hot wax scrape cleaning. It is also the best for most skiing activities.

Yellow waxes are appropriate for warmer areas of between 0 and minus-4 degrees Celsius. (32 and 25 degrees Fahrenheit).

  1. Fluorocarbons- fluorocarbon waxes can either be low or high fluorocarbon. These waxes repel water more, adding speed to your ski boards. As a result, they cost significantly more than ordinary waxes and are most preferred by professional skiers. Low fluorocarbon waxes are particularly suitable for those training and intermediate skiers, while advanced skiers prefer high fluorocarbons. It’s however important to note that the higher the fluorocarbon content, the higher the cost.


Wax, is usually applied using a special wax iron. You can use an old clothes iron box, but the wax won’t come out fast. Also, the temperature fluctuations in cloth irons are much higher than the wax iron.

Apply the wax on your skating board then use the iron to melt it and spread it evenly across the entire board, ensuring that the wax gets on the board. Zigzag motions are the best for covering the entire base. Take care not to overheat the wax. Overheated wax reacts by producing smoke.

Scraping and Brushing.

After ironing, you should give the board some time to cool. Say a minimum of thirty minutes. You could use a plastic scraper to scrape off the excess wax until only a thin layer of wax is visible.

After scraping, use waxing brushes to clean off excess wax. Start off with coarse brushes, finishing with the softer brushes.





Japan Ski Packages

5 things to remember when travelling to Japan for a skiing holiday


If you are looking for an incredible place to Ski or Snowboard this year then you should most certainly check out Madarao in Japan. Japan offers some of the most incredible conditions for skiing in the entire world. They boast deep and consistent powder, relatively untouched slopes and a culture that will render you awe-struck and inspired.

The Japanese culture is however vastly different to that of the western world and some other European skiing destinations such as the French Alps. In this light it is important that you brush up one a couple of essentials and basic etiquette before you arrive at your destination.

1: Blending in

One of the golden rules of travelling is trying to blend in. Now this is understandably easier said than done, being an Australian in Japan, though showing a little respect and taking an interest in their culture and matters that are important to them. The most important of which is minding your tone of voice. It is all too easy for English speaking westerners to come across as overbearing and loud or overly familiar so try to show a little respect and you will be welcomed with open arms.

2: Learn a few of the basics in Japanese

This isn’t an essentiality, though it will certainly go a long way towards making your life easier when travelling through Japan. A few simple words and phrases such as “Hello”, “Goodbye”, and “Nice to meet you” will make all the difference and make you feel more at ease as well. You will find some basics, here.

3: Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery

Within reason! Don’t walk around trying to pretend that you are Japanese, but simply do as they do in the sense that you are respectful of their values. For example: tipping is not a common practice in Japan and is often considered as rude. This may be quite hard to wrap your head around coming from a western culture, though it is something that you must bear in mind so as not to offend anyone.

Also, be prepared to take your shoes off in most places. The Japanese are a very clean people so follow their lead on this. Do not litter and try not to eat in places where nobody else is eating. Again, some of these things may seem rather trivial to you, but a little manners costs nothing right?

4: Gift Giving

If you have thoroughly enjoyed your skiing holiday and you want to reward or thank some of the staff at your resort; tipping is going to feel like the most natural thing to do. Again, as we’ve established leaving a tip can actually be considered as being rude, however gift giving is a different thing entirely. If you really want to make an impact on the people that you are staying with then gifting them something from home will go down very well indeed.

5: Credit Cards are rarely accepted

Carrying cash around with you may not feel safe, or natural, though it will likely be your best option if you don’t want to find yourself stuck and unable to pay for something. Japan is largely a cash based country so do bear in mind that most places will not accept a credit card before you travel. It is always best to ensure that you have plenty of cash, kept safely on you.


So there you have it: a few basic bits of information that will assist you on your holiday to Japan. You will never experience a holiday quite like it, particularly if you are skiing. The Japanese are a wonderfully kind and patient people who will most certainly go above and beyond to ensure that your holiday will be one to remember. Find information on our amazing offers, here.