Things to consider

Top Tips on Different Wax Types for Different Slope Conditions.

04Aug

Tips on Different Wax Types for Different Slope Conditions.

Waxing is a maintenance activity that involves applying a lubricant to your ski’s to reduce friction mainly. Waxing works by providing a hydrophobic surface on your board, which resists water.

What’s the Importance of Ski Waxing?

With time, your board gets damaged by hitting rocks, rusting, friction or chemical damage from chemically treated snow.

The most obvious reason for waxing is to reduce friction, hence being able to move faster. Waxing also reduces the rate at which your ski’s wears out.

How Often Should I Wax My Skis?

There’s no given duration after which you should wax your ski’s. However, logic dictates that the more you use your board, the more you should wax it. Just looking at your board can tell you whether or not you need to wax it. If the bottom looks dull and gray, it’s time to wax. There is no such thing as too much waxing. In fact, the more you do it, the better.

Ski Tuning

Ski tuning is a general term for ski maintenance that aims to keep your ski’s sharp, clean and smooth.

Waxing in itself will not make much of a difference if you haven’t repaired your base and edges. In fact, waxing is the last tuning step, preceded by base repair and edge work.

Base repair involves cleaning out your board or ski using a cleaning cloth, which removes dirt, grease, and accumulated wax. Most tuning kits come with a specialized cleaning liquid, which brings out hidden dirt and dissolves wax. After cleaning the ski, apply this liquid, and then wipe it out with a clean towel after 10 minutes.

Next step is the p-tex filling, whereby you light your p-tex candle and wait until it is flames. Let the drops drip onto your ski’s/board, filling out all cuts and scrapes. Give the p-tex 10-15 minutes to cool then scrape it off with a metal scraper, to remove excess p-tex.

Edge tuning involves keeping the edges of your board or ski sharp. Blunt edges have a weak grip on snow, which slows you down. The first step is running a diamond stone, over the edges, giving you smooth edges

Next step is using a special file to sharpen your edges. Do this from tip to tail, taking care not to distort the shape of the edges.

 

Waxing

What Wax Should I Use?

  1. All temperature waxes- these waxes are designed to work in all temperature conditions. Sometimes you may find yourself skiing in different geographical areas, or unable to predict what the temperature will be. All temperature wax, in this case, will be your best bet.
  2. Temperature specific waxes- temperature specific waxes are usually identified as either red or yellow. They both work in a smaller range of temperatures than all temperature waxes.

Red waxes are designed for colder temperatures of between -4 and -10 degrees (25 and 18 degrees Fahrenheit). Red wax is the best when it comes to hot wax scrape cleaning. It is also the best for most skiing activities.

Yellow waxes are appropriate for warmer areas of between 0 and minus-4 degrees Celsius. (32 and 25 degrees Fahrenheit).

  1. Fluorocarbons- fluorocarbon waxes can either be low or high fluorocarbon. These waxes repel water more, adding speed to your ski boards. As a result, they cost significantly more than ordinary waxes and are most preferred by professional skiers. Low fluorocarbon waxes are particularly suitable for those training and intermediate skiers, while advanced skiers prefer high fluorocarbons. It’s however important to note that the higher the fluorocarbon content, the higher the cost.

Ironing

Wax, is usually applied using a special wax iron. You can use an old clothes iron box, but the wax won’t come out fast. Also, the temperature fluctuations in cloth irons are much higher than the wax iron.

Apply the wax on your skating board then use the iron to melt it and spread it evenly across the entire board, ensuring that the wax gets on the board. Zigzag motions are the best for covering the entire base. Take care not to overheat the wax. Overheated wax reacts by producing smoke.

Scraping and Brushing.

After ironing, you should give the board some time to cool. Say a minimum of thirty minutes. You could use a plastic scraper to scrape off the excess wax until only a thin layer of wax is visible.

After scraping, use waxing brushes to clean off excess wax. Start off with coarse brushes, finishing with the softer brushes.

 

 

 

 

Japan Ski Packages

5 things to remember when travelling to Japan for a skiing holiday

19Jan

If you are looking for an incredible place to Ski or Snowboard this year then you should most certainly check out Madarao in Japan. Japan offers some of the most incredible conditions for skiing in the entire world. They boast deep and consistent powder, relatively untouched slopes and a culture that will render you awe-struck and inspired.

The Japanese culture is however vastly different to that of the western world and some other European skiing destinations such as the French Alps. In this light it is important that you brush up one a couple of essentials and basic etiquette before you arrive at your destination.

1: Blending in

One of the golden rules of travelling is trying to blend in. Now this is understandably easier said than done, being an Australian in Japan, though showing a little respect and taking an interest in their culture and matters that are important to them. The most important of which is minding your tone of voice. It is all too easy for English speaking westerners to come across as overbearing and loud or overly familiar so try to show a little respect and you will be welcomed with open arms.

2: Learn a few of the basics in Japanese

This isn’t an essentiality, though it will certainly go a long way towards making your life easier when travelling through Japan. A few simple words and phrases such as “Hello”, “Goodbye”, and “Nice to meet you” will make all the difference and make you feel more at ease as well. You will find some basics, here.

3: Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery

Within reason! Don’t walk around trying to pretend that you are Japanese, but simply do as they do in the sense that you are respectful of their values. For example: tipping is not a common practice in Japan and is often considered as rude. This may be quite hard to wrap your head around coming from a western culture, though it is something that you must bear in mind so as not to offend anyone.

Also, be prepared to take your shoes off in most places. The Japanese are a very clean people so follow their lead on this. Do not litter and try not to eat in places where nobody else is eating. Again, some of these things may seem rather trivial to you, but a little manners costs nothing right?

4: Gift Giving

If you have thoroughly enjoyed your skiing holiday and you want to reward or thank some of the staff at your resort; tipping is going to feel like the most natural thing to do. Again, as we’ve established leaving a tip can actually be considered as being rude, however gift giving is a different thing entirely. If you really want to make an impact on the people that you are staying with then gifting them something from home will go down very well indeed.

5: Credit Cards are rarely accepted

Carrying cash around with you may not feel safe, or natural, though it will likely be your best option if you don’t want to find yourself stuck and unable to pay for something. Japan is largely a cash based country so do bear in mind that most places will not accept a credit card before you travel. It is always best to ensure that you have plenty of cash, kept safely on you.

 

So there you have it: a few basic bits of information that will assist you on your holiday to Japan. You will never experience a holiday quite like it, particularly if you are skiing. The Japanese are a wonderfully kind and patient people who will most certainly go above and beyond to ensure that your holiday will be one to remember. Find information on our amazing offers, here.