ski

Top Tips on Different Wax Types for Different Slope Conditions.

04Aug

Tips on Different Wax Types for Different Slope Conditions.

Waxing is a maintenance activity that involves applying a lubricant to your ski’s to reduce friction mainly. Waxing works by providing a hydrophobic surface on your board, which resists water.

What’s the Importance of Ski Waxing?

With time, your board gets damaged by hitting rocks, rusting, friction or chemical damage from chemically treated snow.

The most obvious reason for waxing is to reduce friction, hence being able to move faster. Waxing also reduces the rate at which your ski’s wears out.

How Often Should I Wax My Skis?

There’s no given duration after which you should wax your ski’s. However, logic dictates that the more you use your board, the more you should wax it. Just looking at your board can tell you whether or not you need to wax it. If the bottom looks dull and gray, it’s time to wax. There is no such thing as too much waxing. In fact, the more you do it, the better.

Ski Tuning

Ski tuning is a general term for ski maintenance that aims to keep your ski’s sharp, clean and smooth.

Waxing in itself will not make much of a difference if you haven’t repaired your base and edges. In fact, waxing is the last tuning step, preceded by base repair and edge work.

Base repair involves cleaning out your board or ski using a cleaning cloth, which removes dirt, grease, and accumulated wax. Most tuning kits come with a specialized cleaning liquid, which brings out hidden dirt and dissolves wax. After cleaning the ski, apply this liquid, and then wipe it out with a clean towel after 10 minutes.

Next step is the p-tex filling, whereby you light your p-tex candle and wait until it is flames. Let the drops drip onto your ski’s/board, filling out all cuts and scrapes. Give the p-tex 10-15 minutes to cool then scrape it off with a metal scraper, to remove excess p-tex.

Edge tuning involves keeping the edges of your board or ski sharp. Blunt edges have a weak grip on snow, which slows you down. The first step is running a diamond stone, over the edges, giving you smooth edges

Next step is using a special file to sharpen your edges. Do this from tip to tail, taking care not to distort the shape of the edges.

 

Waxing

What Wax Should I Use?

  1. All temperature waxes- these waxes are designed to work in all temperature conditions. Sometimes you may find yourself skiing in different geographical areas, or unable to predict what the temperature will be. All temperature wax, in this case, will be your best bet.
  2. Temperature specific waxes- temperature specific waxes are usually identified as either red or yellow. They both work in a smaller range of temperatures than all temperature waxes.

Red waxes are designed for colder temperatures of between -4 and -10 degrees (25 and 18 degrees Fahrenheit). Red wax is the best when it comes to hot wax scrape cleaning. It is also the best for most skiing activities.

Yellow waxes are appropriate for warmer areas of between 0 and minus-4 degrees Celsius. (32 and 25 degrees Fahrenheit).

  1. Fluorocarbons- fluorocarbon waxes can either be low or high fluorocarbon. These waxes repel water more, adding speed to your ski boards. As a result, they cost significantly more than ordinary waxes and are most preferred by professional skiers. Low fluorocarbon waxes are particularly suitable for those training and intermediate skiers, while advanced skiers prefer high fluorocarbons. It’s however important to note that the higher the fluorocarbon content, the higher the cost.

Ironing

Wax, is usually applied using a special wax iron. You can use an old clothes iron box, but the wax won’t come out fast. Also, the temperature fluctuations in cloth irons are much higher than the wax iron.

Apply the wax on your skating board then use the iron to melt it and spread it evenly across the entire board, ensuring that the wax gets on the board. Zigzag motions are the best for covering the entire base. Take care not to overheat the wax. Overheated wax reacts by producing smoke.

Scraping and Brushing.

After ironing, you should give the board some time to cool. Say a minimum of thirty minutes. You could use a plastic scraper to scrape off the excess wax until only a thin layer of wax is visible.

After scraping, use waxing brushes to clean off excess wax. Start off with coarse brushes, finishing with the softer brushes.

 

 

 

 

Skiing lessons in Japan

Groomed vs. Ungroomed Skiing, and Other Such Lingo.

07Jul

Here at Active Life Madarao, we like to spoil you. And that means giving you the best of everything. So when it comes to your choice of ski slope, we make no exception.

If you are an experienced skier, you probably already have your favourite type of ski slope. With over 30 ski runs, we bet by the end of your stay with us, you’ll have your favourite run here too.

If you are a beginner, or have never even set a ski-donned foot on a slope before, then you probably don’t know what we’re talking about when we say ‘groomed’ and ‘ungroomed’ ski runs.

Don’t panic, it has nothing to do with your personal upkeep. We don’t send our guests rocking the bedhead look after a late night at our bar Tap That, to the ungroomed slope. There’s no judgement here.

A groomed slope is simply a slope we’ve taken our snow-groomer to. We send one of our lovely staff members out in the snow-groomer to drive down the slopes, which packs all the snow down and makes it nice and tightly compressed.

We don’t just do this because we love having a ride down the slopes on the snow-groomer (although we really do), but because it makes it an easier surface to ski down.

This makes it perfect for people who are learning to ski, as well as seasoned skiers.

An ungroomed slope is simply a slope that hasn’t been groomed by our snow-groomer! Try saying that sentence after a few of our craft beers.

Many skiers prefer this type of slope as it has a slightly wilder yet softer feel. It can be slighter harder on the joints as you need to use a lot more physical power to break through the trails. However, some people prefer this type of slope, and it really just comes down to a matter of preference.

Words

Different words from different language in the background there is a moutain.

Speaking of breaking trails…

Even if you’ve never been skiing before, we want you to feel completely at home at Active Life Madarao. We understand that it can be slightly intimating to take your first venture into the wonderful world of skiing, and that all the lingo you may hear flying around might be confusing.

Just like always, we’re here to help by breaking down some of the key jargon you might hear:

Run

The run is the path that you ski down. We always have these clearly marked at Active Life Madarao, and this is for both your safety, and so you have the best possible experience on the best maintained runs.

Breaking trail

This means skiing down a run with fresh snow that hasn’t been skied down yet. In other words, no previous ski trails.

Groomed vs. ungroomed trail

Er, we just did this. If you’ve forgotten already, you may want to re-read this blog post!

Active Life Madarao

Two amazing hotels –Active Life Madarao Hotel, and Hakken By Active Life Madarao Hotel in Madarao, Japan! Skiing in Japan at its finest!

Après-Ski

Literally translated from French, this means ‘after-ski‘. At Active Life Madarao, we translate it to mean ‘exquisite dinners, beers in the bar, bubble baths, and general relaxation’. Luckily for you, we can provide all of that in our hotel accommodation.

Bunny

This is a term sometimes used for a beginner. You may also hear ‘bunny slope/hill’, referring to the slopes used for beginners. It’s not meant as an insult, we were all beginners once. In fact, we think bunnies are very cute.

Shredder

A shredder is someone who is a very experienced, and talented skier. One or two of our staff members are shredders, according to them anyway…

Wipeout

A wipeout is when you fall over, and crash into the snow. Don’t worry, it happens to all of us!

Powder

Just another word for snow. You may also hear ‘pow’, or ‘pow-pow’. Yes, we are obsessed with snow.

These is just a few of the more common lingo you may hear. There is plenty more where that came from, and if you overhear anything you’re confused about, please do feel free to ask any of our lovely English-speaking staff members for a translation.

See you on the pow-pow!